St. Peter's C.E. Primary School

St. Peter's Church of England Primary School

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Reading

At St. Peter’s we aim to instil a love of books within our children that will remain with them for life.  When teaching children to read, staff model the use of a wide range of strategies to support their learning so that they are able to become accurate and fluent readers.  This will enable them to access the full curriculum.

The structured reading programme is centred around the Oxford Reading Tree scheme, but also draws from a wide range of other books.  Children are encouraged to read regularly and take home a wide variety of reading material.  Our Homework Policy clearly states that sharing books, rehearsing phonics and playing word games is a key part of homework encouraged from an early age. All children are encouraged to read to an adult for 10 to 20 minutes several times a week. When receiving a new book, younger children are encouraged to read it at least three times for decoding, fluency and then for comprehension.

Our reading scheme books are organised to support our ‘Letters and Sounds’ based approach to the teaching of phonics. To find out more about the teaching of phonics, click here.  Books are colour banded and distinguished by a coloured sticker on the spine. Teachers regularly assess whether a child is reading books which present an appropriate level of challenge. In order to move up to the next coloured band, a child needs to demonstrate fluency, accuracy and understanding of the text read. If, when hearing their child read, parents feel that they are demonstrating these qualities then they are encouraged to make a note for the class teacher in their reading diary who will then check if it is appropriate for a child to move bands.

The library is used as a learning resource centre where the children can develop library skills. They have access to a range of fiction and non-fiction books, magazines, and the World Wide Web. We aim to encourage a life-long love of reading for enjoyment and information.

As children become more fluent it is helpful to begin to ask them questions about the text they are reading.  Whatever a child's age and level of fluency, they all benefit greatly from having the opportunity to read aloud to another adult. The following booklet is shared with adult helpers in school to provide guidance how they can assist in a child's reading development.  Suggested questions for more confident readers are also included.

Adobe PDF icon Guidance for Adult Helpers Reading with Children